Jim Carlton, an American Airlines ramp agent, stood on the tarmac at Washington's Dulles International Airport for 247 work days, more than a year's time after 9/11, greeting every arriving and departing plane with a flag salute - in honor of his fallen colleagues. This photo, given to Jim, first appeared in the Washington Post and was taken by Frank Johnston.

Classic "Proudly I Fly" stories:

"My Uniform"
Aviation "Thank You"
Why Does Mary Fly?
Turning Loss into Action
Flying the Flag
Joy in Giving

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"We may affirm absolutely that nothing great in the world has been accomplished without passion."

- Georg Wilhem Friedrich Hegel

Stresses mount, including economic pressures, yet despite the challenges aviation professionals continue to put on their uniforms and keep America's great air transportation system moving forward. How do you do it?

What inspires you to do your best under pressure?

We're looking for a "Thousand Stories of Pride" from aviation workers, stories that reflect the character and determination of those who keep America flying. Do you work with an airline, airport or aviation government agency tell us how you meet the challenges of these uncertain times.

Below, answer this question in as many words as you would like in a single sentence or longer:

"I'm an aviation professional: I'm proud of what I do because..."



Name:
Email:
Your Airport or Airline:
Story:


Consider these questions as you compose your answer:

  • What got you into aviation and what keeps you in the game?
  • Do you have colleagues who deserve to be credited for THEIR pride, which inspires you?
  • If you're retired, do you have a special memory you hold onto?
  • Is there a passenger, or a moment on the job, that stays with you and sustains you?
  • After 9/11 have you dedicated - or rededicated - yourself to an ideal or a project - something that helps you "move forward" personally as well as professionally?

After you share your story, allow 24 hours, then visit our MESSAGE BOARD. There you'll find your story posted among those of your colleagues who have expressed their pride in the work they do. (New comments appear regularly - so check the Message Board frequently.)

The goal of our "Thousand Stories of Pride" project is to create more public support for the work aviation professionals do day in and day out to keep America flying. Thank you for joining in and becoming one of our "thousand" stories.

  • To read current "Proudly I Fly" stories Click here.